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len_fromoz

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Hi all. Just joined, I've heard there's some valuable FS resources on this site and I'm looking forward to finding them, but I speak no Russian and I'm finding the Cyrillic script quite daunting. I was able to register, chiefly by guessing which box to type in, and it was easy enough to find the registration key (it was the biggest string of recognisable characters on the e-mail the registration board sent me) but from there I'm a bit lost. Can any English speaking friends give me some clues as to how to find my way round?

Looking forward to hearing from you.

len_fromoz

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Greetings and welcome to the forum.

 

Notice, anytime you can address free online russian-to english translator that translates entire web pages as well as single words and phrases.

 

If anything remains uncleared feel free to post a message concerning what exactly needs to be explained.

 

denn

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Good afternoon! What particularly you search? Scenery, additions or models of planes?

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The guy seems to have lost his hope to get what he wanted...

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Hi everyone.

 

I have found many excellent downloads here that are not easy to get anywhere else. A "Google" search just brought me to this forum, where I see lenfromoz started this thread. My forum name is one I have had elsewhere for years - we are not related. :pilotfly:

 

I was used to the old avsim.su site, and by comparison, this site is very much easier. The terms of membership didn't translate to English but I guess they are the same as for other sites! I will get used to finding what a reply button looks like. And smileys are nearly the same in any language. :sarcastic: I suspect lenfromoz is now finding his way around.

 

I used to have three set-ups of FS2004, for the 1920-30 period, the 1950-60 period and present day. Right now I have just one, the 1950-60 period, based mainly on "Silver Wings" (slvrwngs.zip at www.avsim.com) and downloads from http://www.calclassic.com/

 

It was CalClassics' Berlin and East German sceneries which got me interested in setting up what scenery and AI traffic I could find for Russia. Many of the air bases from avsim.sus I find look good with old Tupolev bombers and Mil helicopters as AI. So thanks to all the simmers who have kindly made their work available here!

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On-line Russian KeyBoard:

http://www.translit.ru/

 

And what?

This is the query about translation. I doubt non russian speaking expats are able to print with russian letters.

Please, don't post off-top here. If you don't know what to write, please, write nothing!

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The differences between Russian grammar and English grammar from the point of view of a native English speaker is quite amazing. More so with tense and articles. Someday I'd like to take the time to learn Russian (and go to Russia), but I've got to finish Español first...

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The differences between Russian grammar and English grammar from the point of view of a native English speaker is quite amazing. More so with tense and articles. Someday I'd like to take the time to learn Russian (and go to Russia), but I've got to finish Espaсol first...

We will be glad to welcome you here!

 

As a person involved with philology and linguistics, I would like to say that your observation is quite interesting and shows you being a thoughtful person. While also not speaking English natively I must say that much time ago I have made an observation which is quite symmetrical, so to speak, with yours: English is very logically simple and that's why it's easy to learn. A lot easier than Russian :) As I can see, the secret is very strict set of rules, strict structure and, what seems the most important, very strict orientation on obeying this set of rules to speak correctly. (That's why I would like to apologize for my English - it could be better.)

 

In Russian you have a large set of rules. You don't have problems with articles in English - you have just three there, but you have no articles in Russian it all. But while getting rid of learning articles you get a joy :) of learning cases and declensions. I know one American native English speaking girl. When we were introduced to each other I thought she is Russian (so good her Russian was!), but later I learned the truth and began to watch her speech and enunciation (she didn't mind). I saw that even she made mistakes in those case endings while speaking (you always need to concord endings of the nouns with the endings of adjectives in correct cases while speaking). An that's only a part of the party :)

 

The other part is that when you have a strict prohibition of breaking the rules it makes the life simple. When you have a certain freedom of obeying them it is much more difficult. For instance, in Russian you can modify the rules on-the-fly, but if you do it incorrectly you can create quite different sense or meaning of your whole thought.

 

At last, Russian has very many exceptions from the rules, which are so numerous, that not everyone can follow the logic. While you're not quite involved in learning Russian for now, if I have understood you correctly, I will give you a few examples in "translit" (i.e. Russian using Roman alphabet).

 

In a sake of discussion let's take three nouns:

долото', боло'то, зо'лото

doloto', bolo'to, zo'loto

(chisel, swamp, gold)

 

Take the note of the stress. As you can see, these three words are all the same in Russian - just the first letter is different. I can't say and can't find any information, what rule makes you place the stresses this way and so different. And all the speaking is not about the rule which may exist or may not, but about the non-native speaker, which has a hard time of learning this strange situation.

 

Another example with a sequence of letters and pronunciation. In Russian we have a single letter to denote the sound which in English is made by a diphthong "ch". This letter looks very similar to number four - "Ч". But we have many situations when we have our own diphthong "ChT" - "ЧТ". The same is for "sh" - we have a letter "Ш". If you don't see the cyrillic I use it looks much like "W". We never write "Ш" (W) with T nearby, but always "Ч" (Ch), but the reading is different.

Let's see.

 

English - Russian - Russian-in-Roman [simplified transcription]

1. Reading - Чте'ние - Chtenie [ch-t-eh'-nee-ye] - note the pronunciation of the beginning - we say "ch-t-eh..."

2. What - Что - Chto [sh-t-oh].

 

Note, we write the letter "Ч" (Ch) in both words in the beginning, but in the first case we read it as "ch" and never as "sh", while in the second case we read it as "sh" and never as "ch". I don't know why :( It happened so historically, I presume.

 

So, I wish you good luck with your Espaсol and good luck in starting with you Russian, they are both very interesting, rich and beautiful. I'm sure you will have very well qualified tutor, but if you will have any questions, please, feel free to contact me. You can always find me here and drop me a private message or ask your questions here, on the forums. My name is Ilya (English analogue is Elijah).

 

With Best Regards.

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Someday I'd like to take the time to learn Russian (and go to Russia), but I've got to finish Español first...

¡Buenos dias, amigo!

¡¡¡Bienvenida a la ciudad de Moscú!!!

¡Espanol es la mejor lengua en el todo mundo!

Te deseo aprender Español, Inglés y Ruso y hablarlos es muy bueno.

¿Cuánto tiempo estudias ya español?

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We will be glad to welcome you here!

 

As a person involved with philology and linguistics, I would like to say that your observation is quite interesting and shows you being a thoughtful person. While also not speaking English natively I must say that much time ago I have made an observation which is quite symmetrical, so to speak, with yours: English is very logically simple and that's why it's easy to learn. A lot easier than Russian :rolleyes: As I can see, the secret is very strict set of rules, strict structure and, what seems the most important, very strict orientation on obeying this set of rules to speak correctly. (That's why I would like to apologize for my English - it could be better.)

 

In Russian you have a large set of rules. You don't have problems with articles in English - you have just three there, but you have no articles in Russian it all. But while getting rid of learning articles you get a joy :) of learning cases and declensions. I know one American native English speaking girl. When we were introduced to each other I thought she is Russian (so good her Russian was!), but later I learned the truth and began to watch her speech and enunciation (she didn't mind). I saw that even she made mistakes in those case endings while speaking (you always need to concord endings of the nouns with the endings of adjectives in correct cases while speaking). An that's only a part of the party :)

 

The other part is that when you have a strict prohibition of breaking the rules it makes the life simple. When you have a certain freedom of obeying them it is much more difficult. For instance, in Russian you can modify the rules on-the-fly, but if you do it incorrectly you can create quite different sense or meaning of your whole thought.

 

At last, Russian has very many exceptions from the rules, which are so numerous, that not everyone can follow the logic. While you're not quite involved in learning Russian for now, if I have understood you correctly, I will give you a few examples in "translit" (i.e. Russian using Roman alphabet).

 

In a sake of discussion let's take three nouns:

долото', боло'то, зо'лото

doloto', bolo'to, zo'loto

(chisel, swamp, gold)

 

Take the note of the stress. As you can see, these three words are all the same in Russian - just the first letter is different. I can't say and can't find any information, what rule makes you place the stresses this way and so different. And all the speaking is not about the rule which may exist or may not, but about the non-native speaker, which has a hard time of learning this strange situation.

 

Another example with a sequence of letters and pronunciation. In Russian we have a single letter to denote the sound which in English is made by a diphthong "ch". This letter looks very similar to number four - "Ч". But we have many situations when we have our own diphthong "ChT" - "ЧТ". The same is for "sh" - we have a letter "Ш". If you don't see the cyrillic I use it looks much like "W". We never write "Ш" (W) with T nearby, but always "Ч" (Ch), but the reading is different.

Let's see.

 

English - Russian - Russian-in-Roman [simplified transcription]

1. Reading - Чте'ние - Chtenie [ch-t-eh'-nee-ye] - note the pronunciation of the beginning - we say "ch-t-eh..."

2. What - Что - Chto [sh-t-oh].

 

Note, we write the letter "Ч" (Ch) in both words in the beginning, but in the first case we read it as "ch" and never as "sh", while in the second case we read it as "sh" and never as "ch". I don't know why :) It happened so historically, I presume.

 

So, I wish you good luck with your Espaсol and good luck in starting with you Russian, they are both very interesting, rich and beautiful. I'm sure you will have very well qualified tutor, but if you will have any questions, please, feel free to contact me. You can always find me here and drop me a private message or ask your questions here, on the forums. My name is Ilya (English analogue is Elijah).

 

With Best Regards.

 

Your English is very good. Russian definitely seems more complicated to learn than English, but I'd still find it fun to learn. I found out that one of my friend's mother teaches Russian at a local college (along with his father being from Russia), so that may be where I'd go.

 

Thanks!

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¡Buenos dias, amigo!

¡¡¡Bienvenida a la ciudad de Moscú!!!

¡Espanol es la mejor lengua en el todo mundo!

Te deseo aprender Español, Inglés y Ruso y hablarlos es muy bueno.

¿Cuánto tiempo estudias ya español?

¡Hola!

 

I've been learning Spanish for about a couple of months. I only know enough to get myself around a city like Madrid or Mexico City, shop, and have a small conversation, but I hope to go on to "level 5" Spanish (I've only just finished Pre-1). I've found it relatively easy to learn because of it's similarity to English. It's also a fun language to learn and speak. Best of luck on your Spanish!

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¡Hola!

 

I've been learning Spanish for about a couple of months. I only know enough to get myself around a city like Madrid or Mexico City, shop, and have a small conversation, but I hope to go on to "level 5" Spanish (I've only just finished Pre-1). I've found it relatively easy to learn because of it's similarity to English. It's also a fun language to learn and speak. Best of luck on your Spanish!

U 2!

Thanks a lot!

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The differences between Russian grammar and English grammar from the point of view of a native English speaker is quite amazing. More so with tense and articles. Someday I'd like to take the time to learn Russian (and go to Russia), but I've got to finish Español first...

Hello and welcome to this forum!

 

It's very good that you would like to learn Russian. It's very rich and powerful as well as one Russian writer told. :)

I have been studying English since my childhood (now I'm almost 18), and I've succeeded in studying. It's not now a problem for me to speak English fluently. Now I continue studying English at the university, especially business English.

I must say, that English is easier than Russian. B)

 

So, good luck to you! :D

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